(Re)discover new LUN in linux without rebooting

Note to self… Has 1 disk (/dev/sda) and want to “find” newly added disk (/dev/sdb) without reboot:

echo 'scsi add-single-device 0 0 1 0' > /proc/scsi/scsi

The first “0” is the controller, next “0” is the SCSI channel, the “1” is the target ID, and the last “0” the H-LUN.

After repartitioning with fdisk, the kernel remembers the old partition table, so remove the device and add it again to refresh it:

echo 'scsi remove-single-device 0 0 1 0' > /proc/scsi/scsi
echo 'scsi add-single-device 0 0 1 0' > /proc/scsi/scsi

Why spamassassin fails to start after upgrade

I decided that it was time to upgrade our spam filters today. It runs on 4 virtual gentoo installations, and it’s based on postfix and amavisd-new.

Most of the time, I find gentoo is really as beautiful as a distro can get. They try to do TheRightThing, and don’t fail as bad as the debian gang does most of the time.

Perl with CPAN is of course never going to be “compatible” with a package-based distro, but in Gentoo the developers are clever and caring, and they make tools like perl-cleaner that actually does a remarkable job.

As always, I’m employing the lazy upgrade methodology, (also known as ad-hoc patching, or on-demand upgrading, or more bluntly: I upgrade whenever I feel like it and have the time). This approach and gentoo is not always the best combination, but because gentoo is as good as it is, things usually work out very well for me, even when upgrading gblic, or, as recently, the init/baselayout. Gentoo is amazing. I still love it.

Anyway… After upgrading perl, spamassassin, and some other dependencies, spamassassin wouldn’t start, and the error message was a very cryptic:

child process [1234] exited or timed out without signaling production of a PID file: exit 25 at /usr/local/bin/spamd line 3334.

The solution? Just run “sa-update” to download new rules. Then it started just fine.

0x800704CF when restoring a windows system image?

Windows 7 has really nice backup and recovery features. However, they are not as well worked out as the day-to-day windows features, and, hence, lacking in user-friendliness.

I struggled quite some time before I realised the error message 0x800704CF was due to the network chip driver not being loaded. What I had to do to be able to restore the system image over the network, was to first load the network driver from the CD-Rom that came with the motherboard.

What really fooled me the most was the authentication dialog probing for network credentials popping up. Why ask if you don’t have access to the network?

For my new Asus P8Z68-V Pro motherboard, to load the network driver, I had to browse to E:\Drivers\LAN\APPS\SETUP\SETUPBD\Winx64\, and instead of double-clicking on an INF or SYS file, I had to launch the program:

E:\Drivers\LAN\APPS\SETUP\SETUPBD\Winx64\SetupBD.exe

by means of a right click on the SetupBD Application, and then selecting “Run As Administrator”.

Cheers!