Teamviewer trouble, screen cannot be captured, fast user switching error message

Setting up Teamviewer for unattended access on Windows Server 2012 R2 but having trouble getting it work without first logging on to the server in some other way?

If you get the error “The screen cannot be captured at the moment. This is probably due to fast user switching or a disconnected/minimized Remote Desktop session.”, like in this picture:

chances are that you use a “User ID” instead of a “Server ID” when you connect with TeamViewer to the server. I’ve written on Superuser about this teamviewer problem. It took me some (unnecessary) time to figure out, so I hope this tip saves you some of your time.

windows “tail -F” is called “SMS trace”

“SMS trace”/”trace32.exe” or “tracer.exe” for the command-line version of “tail -f” to continually monitor a growing log file can be found in the Microsoft Systems Management Server toolkit, nowadays called System Center Configuration Manager Toolkit (SCCM 2012).

Yay! I think I prefer cygwin + tail -f 🙂

Windows assign user privileges SeTcbPrivilege, SeCreateTokenPrivilege, SeAssignPrimaryTokenPrivilege to cyg_server user for sshd

To set up sshd on cygwin:

  1. install cygwin including the openssh package
  2. create local (or domain?) user “cyg_server” and make it member of the “Administrators” group
  3. gpedit.msc
  • Local Computer Policy -> Computer Configuration -> Windows Settings -> Security Settings -> Local Policies -> User Rights Assignment
  • right click “Act as part of the operating system” -> Properties -> Add User or Group
  • right click “Create a token object” -> Properties -> Add User or Group
  • right click “Replace a process level token” -> Properties -> Add User or Group

Perform a “gpupdate” to sync the policy changes in the domain.

  1. start a bash (cygwin terminal) with Administrative privileges
  2. mkpasswd -l -d YOUR_DOMAIN > /etc/passwd #(skip -d YOUR_DOMAIN if not using a domain)
  3. mkgroup -l -d YOUR_DOMAIN > /etc/group #(skip -d YOUR_DOMAIN if not using a domain)
  4. ssh-host-config -y
  5. “cygrunsrv -S sshd” or “net start sshd”

Done! 🙂

 

Outlook hangs with new account with missing credentials

Yesterday, at work, I was adding a group mailbox that I believed that I had access to, to my outlook 2010 client. For some reason only Microsoft knows about, this forces a restart of the outlook client.

It turned out that I didn’t have the permissions required to this shared mailbox, and when I started outlook it kept asking for username and password for that mailbox.

When I clicked “cancel”, outlook stopped responding for a long time, so navigating to the menu where I could remove the account again took an eternity.

The quick way to remove the account from outlook is, surprisingly, to use the control panel. There is a “Mail” function there. It takes you to the same mail account management dialog as from whithin outlook, only difference being that because outlook is closed, it doesn’t try to open the mailboxes, so I could remove the shared mailbox until I got the permission for it today.

0x800704CF when restoring a windows system image?

Windows 7 has really nice backup and recovery features. However, they are not as well worked out as the day-to-day windows features, and, hence, lacking in user-friendliness.

I struggled quite some time before I realised the error message 0x800704CF was due to the network chip driver not being loaded. What I had to do to be able to restore the system image over the network, was to first load the network driver from the CD-Rom that came with the motherboard.

What really fooled me the most was the authentication dialog probing for network credentials popping up. Why ask if you don’t have access to the network?

For my new Asus P8Z68-V Pro motherboard, to load the network driver, I had to browse to E:\Drivers\LAN\APPS\SETUP\SETUPBD\Winx64\, and instead of double-clicking on an INF or SYS file, I had to launch the program:

E:\Drivers\LAN\APPS\SETUP\SETUPBD\Winx64\SetupBD.exe

by means of a right click on the SetupBD Application, and then selecting “Run As Administrator”.

Cheers!