Outlook hangs with new account with missing credentials

Yesterday, at work, I was adding a group mailbox that I believed that I had access to, to my outlook 2010 client. For some reason only Microsoft knows about, this forces a restart of the outlook client.

It turned out that I didn’t have the permissions required to this shared mailbox, and when I started outlook it kept asking for username and password for that mailbox.

When I clicked “cancel”, outlook stopped responding for a long time, so navigating to the menu where I could remove the account again took an eternity.

The quick way to remove the account from outlook is, surprisingly, to use the control panel. There is a “Mail” function there. It takes you to the same mail account management dialog as from whithin outlook, only difference being that because outlook is closed, it doesn’t try to open the mailboxes, so I could remove the shared mailbox until I got the permission for it today.

0x800704CF when restoring a windows system image?

Windows 7 has really nice backup and recovery features. However, they are not as well worked out as the day-to-day windows features, and, hence, lacking in user-friendliness.

I struggled quite some time before I realised the error message 0x800704CF was due to the network chip driver not being loaded. What I had to do to be able to restore the system image over the network, was to first load the network driver from the CD-Rom that came with the motherboard.

What really fooled me the most was the authentication dialog probing for network credentials popping up. Why ask if you don’t have access to the network?

For my new Asus P8Z68-V Pro motherboard, to load the network driver, I had to browse to E:\Drivers\LAN\APPS\SETUP\SETUPBD\Winx64\, and instead of double-clicking on an INF or SYS file, I had to launch the program:

E:\Drivers\LAN\APPS\SETUP\SETUPBD\Winx64\SetupBD.exe

by means of a right click on the SetupBD Application, and then selecting “Run As Administrator”.

Cheers!

Sigh. Linux is simply better than Windows… (?)

I gave up developing for android with titanium on a windows7 virtual machine in virtualbox on CentOS5.

Decided to go with a native linux development environment. (of course!). How could I have been so stupid to even consider Windows in the first place? I have no idea. Temporary confusion, perhaps. Anyhow…

As much as I hate binary distributions and Debian’s geeky I-know-whats-best-for-you-but-I-pretend-I-give-you-total-control-and-freedom philosophy which often makes more harm than good; I still do my Android development on a Binary Linux Distribution: Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwahl.

Why?

Well, when using third-party linux binaries in a binary distribution, you are pretty much dancing by their command. If they ship a binary that was linked against a very new glibc and libstdc++, which they often are, and were in the case of Titanium Developer (is a piece of junk, I hate it more and more each day), you have to have a binary distribution that matches that version. In case of Titanium Developer, CentOS5.6 is too old. You have to use a recent Fedora or Ubuntu to get the libraries you need. CentOS and all other RPM-based binary distributions will simply break (of course) if you try to force in a libc from another distro, or even build your own, as no utilities are linked against it.

I’m still “new” to ubuntu. Still preferring Gentoo, but I’m at work, and I can’t have too much downtime on my workstation, so I left CentOS for Ubuntu, simply because I need something that just works. (I have Windows on my Laptop, for Outlook and Excel).

Sigh. I miss Gentoo, but Ubuntu will do, I’m sure.

Easy Android Development with Titanium Developer!

Everybody does it… Do you? If not, read on, to see what is needed to create your first HelloWorld Android app! We will use Titanium, which lets you use web technology to build apps for both Android and IOS.

Step 1: set up a development machine.

I like to separate stuff, and I had LOADS of trouble trying on my 64bit Windows 7 (x64), so I chose to install a 32bit (x86) version in VirtualBox (on my CentOS Linux workstation).

On my first attempt, I gave it only 9 GB of disk, which was way too little, so I started over with a 19.5 GB disk (preallocated). Configured the VM with 600MB RAM and no Audio device. I installed Windows 7 Ultimate N (From MSDN), turned off all desktop effects (optimize for performance), installed Google Chrome as the default web browser, unpinned IE from the task bar, pinned Chrome there instead, chose a desktop wallpaper (unneeded, but I couldn’t resist the image of the happy plastic figures holding their knees!), and applied the windows updates, except SP1, because that led me to an irrepairable “fatal error c0000034 applying update operation” error. (Yes, I tried DISM /image:D:\ /cleanup-image /revertpendingactions, even twice).

Step 2: set up the development environment

The development tool we will use is Appcelerator Titanium, and we will develop for Android, so we need the Java SE JDK and Android SDK first.

Java and Android SDK

Since the development machine is a windows host, we choose the Android SDK windows installer, and install it in the default location. It is friendly enough, checking for Java JDK and providing a link to the download page if it is not found. My machine is a fresh install of Windows 7, so we have no Java yet. I installed it through the Windows x86 JDK link after clicking the word “JDK” under the leftmost Java Icon and then accepting the license agreement on the next page. Install Java in the default location.

If you still have the Android SDK installer “hanging” after it didn’t find Java, click the “<Back” button, and then “Next>”, to begin the installation of the Android SDK. The default values are fine.

Add “C:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.6.0_25\bin” to the end of your PATH variable.

SDK Manager

Let the SDK installer start the SDK Manager, let it search for available packages. Being lazy, I let it download everything, by simply choosing “Accept All” and clicking “Install”. This will take a while. Quite a long while if you are on a slow link. Grab a coffee, Energy Drink, Tea, Beer, Milk, whatever and take a break while it downloads and installs what you’ve chosen.

Install Titanium Developer

Download and run the windows installer of Titanium Developer. Its target audience seems to be IOS developers, as there are (still) some annoying bugs in the version I use. For instance, it’s using a (nowadays) incorrect way of finding and checking the Android SDK.

Workaround

To get around the bug in Titanium, copy “adb.exe” and “AdbWinApi.dll” from the “platform-tools” directory to the “tools” directory, under (my example) C:\Program Files\Android\android-sdk\.

Step 3: Set up Titanium

Register a new account, click the green button “New Project” (+) on the top of the window, Click “Desktop” near “Project type:”, and change it to “Mobile”. Click the button with the red X at the bottom where it’s written “Android SDK found” (unless you have a green checkbox there), and help it find the SDK for Android if necessary. (Path in bold in previous paragraph).

Pick a name for your first app, chose an appropriate App Id, pick an empty directory for this app, if you have an URL, enter it, and click “Create Project”. This will create a directory tree starting with your app name, and under it, the directory “Resources“, the file “tiapp.xml” and a bunch of other files.

The Resources directory is the home of “app.js”, your first Android application, written in JavaScript!

Click the “Test & Package” button on the top right on the work space in Titanium. A view with three tabs: “Run Emulator”, “Run on Device” and “Distribute” should be visible. “Run Emulator” should be selected. Below it should be a tab named “Android”, and beneath that, a black log window. If not: delete your new project, import the KitchenSink demo app, and recreate your project. At the bottom you have selections for SDK version, Screen, and a filter for what kind of output to view, as well as a Launch button and a Stop button.

Press “Launch” and wait.

I’ll be back with a coding example. But I think this has been plenty for now!

By the way, if it in the message box (top right corner) says there’s an update for Titanium Mobile available, click the download link…